CRICKETS DEFY SCIENTIFIC LAW SONIC FREQUENCY ATTACK A Whale of a Chem-Tale. EMF-Radiation-Mutation

NATURE ANOMALIES "CRICKET" CHIRPS (sonic frequency attack) DEFY SCIENTIFIC LAWS OF NATURE PLEASE READ! DOLBEAR's SCIENTIFIC LAW: Temp (F) = (# chirps in 14 seconds) + 40 Temp outside was 60 degrees; using Dolbear's Law (68) + 40 = 108!! Precision is within 1 degree, variance here was 48 - flat out impossible based upon a scientific law studied for over a century. This from Wikipedia. Crickets are insects somewhat related to grasshoppers, and more closely related to katydids. They have somewhat flattened bodies and long antennae, tend ... več NATURE ANOMALIES "CRICKET" CHIRPS (sonic frequency attack) DEFY SCIENTIFIC LAWS OF NATURE PLEASE READ!
DOLBEAR's SCIENTIFIC LAW: Temp (F) = (# chirps in 14 seconds) + 40
Temp outside was 60 degrees; using Dolbear's Law (68) + 40 = 108!!
Precision is within 1 degree, variance here was 48 - flat out impossible based upon a scientific law studied for over a century.
This from Wikipedia. Crickets are insects somewhat related to grasshoppers, and more closely related to katydids. They have somewhat flattened bodies and long antennae, tend to be nocturnal, and are often confused with grasshoppers because they have a similar body structure including jumping hind legs. Crickets are harmless to humans.


woah stop the presses. Crickets are harmless to humans? Technically this may be true but the sonic frequency patterns being omitted by quote unquote, crickets, certainly are not harmless.


back to Wikipedia. The sound emitted by crickets is commonly referred to as chirping; the scientific name is stridulation. Only the male crickets chirp. The sound is emitted by a large vein. well that's something new, I didn't know crickets performed an act of stridulation via their large vein. hahahaha. the chirping sound is created by running the top of one wing along the teeth at the bottom of the other wing. It is a popular myth that the cricket chirps by rubbing its legs together. no, rubbing its legs together is how to get paris hilton to chirp.

Crickets chirp at different rates depending on their species and the temperature of their environment. The relationship between temperature and the rate of chirping is known as Dolbear's Law. According to this law, counting the number of chirps produced in 14 seconds and adding 40 will calculate the temperature in degrees Fahrenheit.

Now here we go & it's time to dig into Dolbear's law, and it's not called a law for no reason. Dolbear's law states the relationship between the air temperature and the rate at which snowy tree crickets (Oecanthus fultoni, a tree cricket) chirp. It was formulated by Amos Dolbear and published in 1897 in an article called "The Cricket as a Thermometer."

Dolbear expressed the relationship as the following formula which provides a way to estimate the temperature TF in degrees Fahrenheit from the number of chirps per minute N: This formula is accurate to approximately a single degree when applied to the chirping of the field cricket. So in short the frequency of cricket chirping is so precisely tied to the surrounding temperature it is considered a law, determining temperature by counting the number of chirps produced in 14 seconds & adding 40.

Now keep in mind van-sak had never even heard of this law prior to collecting this footage. I suppose it is his aforementioned knowledge about the precise details of this sonic attack including that coming from nature which ultimately drew him over to this chirping little critter, but it was upon immediately walking out his front door that he was struck by these patterns. For starters these chirps were extremely piercing, echoing down the entire block in precise patterns. In addition the sound of chirps had only begun in the past couple of weeks so the rekindling of these sounds drew him back to last summer. manj

Znanje ogledov 605 dodan 16. 09. 2012

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